Updated: February 2, 2021

Here just the very small list of resources on Mark that I have found most helpful.

It Goes Without Say

The Bible Many times, many teachers, preachers, and small group leaders (myself included) will “cut straight to the chase” and engage the commentary instead of engaging the Word of God.

Remember, the commentaries are not without error—they are the observations of the author. Slow down, pray, read, chew and meditate.  
 


ESV Study Bible Incredible resource.

I have purchased this resource multiple times over.

If I had to pick just one, I use it way more in my Olive Tree Study Bible than anything else.
 
 


Commentaries

Luke: An Expositional Commentary
R.C. Sproul
2020, Reformation Trust Publisher.

This is fresh off the presses. I have read Romans, John, Mark, Acts, 1 & 2 Peter, and Matthew from this set. I can easily recommend every single one of them.

If it ain’t broke, don’t fix it. Keep on truckin'.  


The Gospel of Luke (NICNT)
Norval Geldenhuys
1983, Eerdman’s.

Do I know anything about this guy? Nope. A few Amazon reviewers thought he was super solid and a conservative theologian.

When I started up this series, I was hard up for good Luke resources. By God’s pure grace and timing, this fell into my lap. So I am going out with the horse I rode in on and keeping this as part of the stack.
 


Luke (NIVAC)
Darrell L. Bock
1996, Zondervan.

I swear to beans I have more books from this guy. But a quick looksee on Amazon shows that he is a one-lane kind-of-guy. He knows his Luke-Acts. (Now that I think about it, I am getting him mixed up with Daniel I. Block who wrote Ezekiel (NICOT).)

Anywho, yada, yada, yada, horse I rode in on.  


Calvin’s Commentaries
by John Calvin (Writer) 2009, Baker Books

I mention this because in my go-to mobile Bible Study App, Olive Tree, Calvin’s Commentaries are my go-to Commentary text of choice when I need clarification on the go. You can get the entire digital set for your phone (and computer) for about $40.